Amp Music Guidelines

Music licensing and your show

Amp values the work of songwriters, musicians, and other creative artists. We respect, and ask our users to respect, the permissions we’ve obtained from music rights holders to make their music available on Amp.

We know music licensing can be confusing, which is why we’ve licensed tens of millions of songs for your use on our service, all of which you can find in the Amp Music Library. So long as you follow the rules we’ve laid out here, we’ll be able to continue providing you access to the Amp Music Library for use within your live streams.

The Amp Music Library

The Amp music library is designed to give creators the ability to curate music to share with listeners during their live shows. The licenses we’ve secured allow us to make the materials in the Amp music library available to you and your listeners at no cost to you. The music and other materials in the Amp music library have not been licensed for your use outside of Amp.

To allow us to continue providing you with access to the Amp music library, your use of music on Amp needs to comply with certain licensing rules. What this means is:

  • You may not livestream or record content that includes music or other materials from the Amp music library outside of Amp.
  • The Amp music library will not let you play more than 2 songs from the same album or more than 3 songs from the same artist in any 3-hour period.
  • The Amp music library will not let you repeat a song more than 1 time in any 3-hour period.
  • The Amp music library will not let you play a full song until you have at least 1 listener.
  • Your show may not substantially consist of song requests from listeners.
  • You may not publish or announce song titles or artist names in advance of your show.
  • You may not announce a song is being played on your show until just before the song is played.

You can learn more about how to use the Amp music library here.

Sharing Other Music

If you want to share music from outside of the Amp music library, you’re responsible for obtaining any rights needed to share that music on Amp. It is a violation of our Terms of Use, and potentially a violation of copyright law, to stream or upload content containing copyrighted music unless you have the appropriate rights or authority to share such music on Amp.

Just because you own a vinyl or subscribe to a music service, doesn’t mean you have the right to share that music on Amp. Such a purchase or subscription typically grants you a personal license to access the content only for your personal and private playback.

Types of Music Content

In the sections below, we describe some common types of music content, along with some information about whether you may or may not share that content on Amp.

Here are some examples of music content you may use in Amp shows:

  • Music In the Amp music library – Music added to your livestreams using the Amp music library.
  • Music Owned By You – Music which was written by you and either recorded or performed live by you, and for which you own or control all rights necessary to share the music on Amp, including the rights to the recording, performance, and to the underlying music and lyrics. Please remember that if you have a contractual relationship with an organization that controls rights to your music, such as a record label or publishing company, you should make sure that you are not in violation of that relationship by sharing that music on Amp.
  • Music Licensed To You – Copyrighted music owned by someone other than you, if you have secured a license from the relevant copyright holders authorizing you to share it on Amp.

Here are some examples of music content you may not use in Amp shows:

  • Music Request Style Show – Amp shows may not substantially consist of song requests from listeners.
  • Mixing and Sampling– Playing and/or mixing pre-recorded music tracks which incorporate music, other than music which is owned by you or music which is licensed for you to share on Amp as a part of a mix or sample.

Uses Permitted by Law

Our community is a place for creators to express themselves in remarkable, creative and sometimes transformative ways. In addition to sharing the guidelines above, we think it’s important to note that not all unauthorized uses are infringing uses. Some examples include uses of copyrighted works that qualify for a defense of fair use. We recommend reviewing the counter-notification policies in our DMCA Guidelines if you believe you have received a takedown notification from a rights holder as the result of mistake or misidentification.

How This Impacts You

If you violate these guidelines, you, or we, may receive a DMCA takedown notification from music rights holders and we may have to issue a strike against your Amp account as part of our repeat infringer policy. If you have any questions about our DMCA policies, please review our Community Guidelines.

Last, we want to remind you that our service will evolve over time. From time to time we may need to remove songs or other content as necessary to comply with our music licenses or with applicable laws.

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